2017 energy trends: sun, wind and power cuts?

Posted: January 10, 2017 in Business energy, Energy efficiency, Energy management, Photo-voltaic
Tags: , ,

Solar the cheapest form of energy?

A December report by Bloomberg New Energy Finance found that unsubsidised solar is beginning to see lower costs than wind and other forms of energy, becoming one of the cheapest forms of energy. While the lowest solar costs are being seen in countries such India and Chile (where it is now about half the cost of coal), 2017 looks to be the year that solar becomes truly mainstream.

Windy up north

Not to be outdone, wind generated enough power to supply Scotland for four straight days at the end of December (including Christmas day itself), the longest period when wind supply has matched demand.

The strong end to the year resulted in wind power contributing more to the UK supply in 2016 than coal for the first time, 11.5% of total UK output compared to 9.2%.

However, the government’s withdrawal of subsidies for new onshore wind power has resulted in criticism that one of the lowest cost forms of generation is being denied the support given to far more costly technologies including offshore wind and nuclear.

2017 Christmas in the dark?

The British Infrastructure Group has warned that the National Grid’s buffer between supply and demand could fall to as little as 0.1% next winter, resulting in power failures, particularly if there’s unusually severe weather.

At the moment the supply-demand margin is 1.1%, increasing to 6.6% if emergency measures are implemented.

These measures include paying power stations that would otherwise be closed to be kept on stand-by, businesses and other large consumers using emergency generators and old coal-powered stations being put back into operation, all of which add around £30 a year to a residential energy bill.

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