Archive for November, 2016

To no great surprise Ofgem announced that it had abandoned attempts to introduce a code of conduct for energy brokers/consultants, despite several years, numerous consultations and innumerable workshops.

The code was intended to be a set of standards that set a benchmark for high quality consultants acting as intermediaries between non-domestic energy users and suppliers, protecting businesses from unprofessional and misleading tactics. Initial plans from Ofgem indicating that suppliers would only be able to work with consultants who had signed up to the code of practice have now been scrapped.

Ofgem reported that they found inconclusive evidence of consultant malpractice, so has postponed further work on the code and instead said that consultants should take on voluntary principles to treat businesses fairly.

Things to be aware of when working with a consultant…

  • some consultants may represent a single or small group of suppliers rather than the whole market
  • you’re not obliged to accept an offer from a consultant: ensure you understand their services, fees and T&Cs before accepting
  • make sure you’re comparing like-for-like: supplier and consultant price offers may not be presented in the same way, some charges may be pass-though and therefore vary during the contract lifetime, while others are fixed

Questions for your consultant…

  • how many suppliers will be approached for prices?
  • what will you do to help switch supplier?
  • what other services are included during the life of the contract?
  • how do you charge for your services – a direct fee or an indirect commission?

Although Ofgem doesn’t licence consultants, they must comply with consumer protection legislation such as the Business Protection from Misleading Marketing Regulations (BPMMRs) – and since November 2013 Ofgem has the power to apply to the courts for an injunction to prevent breaches of the BPMMRs.

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